Cpl. Pete Marlo saw a picture identical to this one showing him at the left, his father Joseph, his older brother John, his older brother John, his younger brother Rossi, hanging on the wall of a cottage in southern Sicily during World War II. It was just like the one his father had in their home in New York. When he saw it, he knew he had found his grandparents in Vittoria, Sicily. Photo provided.

This picture was American soldier’s clue in WW II

Pete Marlo of Holiday Estates in Englewood, Fla. served in the 62nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion from Totten, Long Island, N.Y. His unit was attached to Gen. George Patton’s 3rd Army during part of World War II. They fought Field Marshal Irwin Rommel during the disaster at the Kasserine Pass shortly after the Invasion of North…

Lt. Holland, at the left, and Al Meersman of Port Charlotte, Fla. on the right, take a Jeep across the Rhine River on a pontoon bridge at Remagen after the original bridge collapsed during World War II. Photo provided

He landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day plus one

Pfc. Al Meersman was behind quad-fifty caliber machine guns mounted on a halftrack when it rolled out of an LST onto Omaha Beach on D-Day plus one, June 7, 1944. Eleven months later he and his four buddies were on their halftrack when they met the Russians, who were advancing westward fighting the last of…

Marine who fought at Iwo Jima makes last trip home

Ray Richards’ latest battle is as tough as the one he fought more than 60 years ago, when, as an 18-year-old Marine in the 3rd Marine Division, he saw action and was wounded at the start of the Battle for Iwo Jima during the final months of World War II.

John Nemeth of Port Charlotte looks at pictures on the wall of his home of his medals and the B-26 "Marauder" bomber he flew in World War II. Sun photo by Don Moore

Port Charlotte, Fla. man flew B-26 ‘Marauder’ in WWII

By D-Day, June 6, 1944, former 1st Lt. John Nemeth of Port Charlotte, Fla. had flown 40 combat mission over Nazi-occupied Europe in a Martin B-26 “Marauder” bomber named “Johnny Come Lately.” He would fly 27 more in his bomber dubbed “The Widowmaker” by some because of its propensity to crash during takeoffs and landings.