Contact

If you have a war story or a  friend or neighbor has a story, and lives within 35 – 40 miles of Port Charlotte, Fla, please contact me at:

donmoore39 at gmail dot com

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Comments

  1. Don, Just read your story on Mark Bills.His age is given at 58 and his entry into the Army was 1966. This would make him 14 years old when he entered service and 16 years old when these actions took place.Either the age given is wrong or the man’s a phony.Hopefully you’ll follow up on this. If the man’s a phony it needs to be exposed. Thank you.

    • The reason his age is off is because I used the age he was when I first wrote his story 5 or 6 years ago. Eventually when I come up with the hard copy of his story it will list the date the story was written.

      If you look up at the home page, I think under then note about the author, it says that all of the ages used were the ages of the people when their story first appeared in the newspapers which can be as much as 10 years off.

      Mark and everyone else is who he says he is. I can assure you I looked at his DD-214.

      Don Moore
      Sun Newspapers

    • Hi Don,

      Co-incidently I’m looking for any information I can find on my father, Donald James Peach. He was an MP in the Fifth Army and drove for Gen Mark Clark. Have any of your emailers ever heard of him or serve with him? He was in North Africa, Italy, and Germany. I’d love to hear from anyone that may have known him at that time!! God Bless You in all your good work. Carolyn Peach, Melrose, MA.

  2. Mary,
    It hasn’t gone up yet. It will be a while. We put up three a week at present. It will eventually go up.
    Regards,
    Don Moore
    Sun Newspapers

  3. Thank you for leaving the books at the Sun office. We are enjoying reading the Veteran’s stories that you have compiled. Just saw the video of the Veterans History Project. It is a tremendous undertaking and our own Don Moore is part of preserving these great episodes of our veterans. Perhaps one of the staff writers could do a column on the V H Project. It is most worthwhile, we feel that it is. Thanks again for the books.

  4. Don, when will Alex from Sweetbay, B-26 pilot be on the web site ?
    what a good story in the paper, good job! Also a great web site. you are to be commended!
    Keep up the good work,
    Jim Mills

  5. Jim,
    I guess I could get Alex’s story on the web in the next week or so. Also I made contact with your Vietnam guy and have a date to talk to him on Monday. He sounds like a hell of a story.

    I can’t thank you enough for findings these fellows for me. Keep em coming.

    Regards,
    Don Moore
    Sun Newspapers

  6. Mr. Moore,
    You recently interviewed my father, Tony Inzerillo from Punta Gorda, about 3 to 4 weeks ago. I was wondering how long it would be before his article appears on this website? Also the DVD you made for him is not working, it’s pauses at certain points and then just hangs up. Would it be possible to get another copy?

  7. Anthony – Mary will be scheduling your father’s story for Wednesday, November 17. As far as the DVD, try playing it through and if it continues to give you trouble, I’ll get you another one.

  8. Hello,

    My father Curtis Shelton served on the USS Harding. He was an Afro American sailor. He tells us about the day that the ship was hit.

    How can his story be told.

    Thank you very much.

    Cora M. Alston

    • Cora,

      I write stories about service people in the Charlotte Sun daily newspaper’s circulation area in West Coast Florida. Where are you and is your dad still alive? Can’t write a story without a living, breathing sailor who can tell me a story. I’d love to talk to your father if he is in our circulation area.

      Regards,
      Don Moore
      Sun Newspapers

  9. Hello!!! I am a Vietnam Veteran that served on the USS Providence CLG-6 during 1970 to 1973. I am looking for information about Richard Iglewski, E-3 Quartermaster on the USS St. Mary’s during 1944. His daughter is interested to find this information to share with her two sons. Any help is greatly appreciated.

    Thank you, Tom

  10. Don,
    I’ve just received Your mail about informations i was asking and i’m sincerely gratefull for Your answer, i didn’t know we were neighbours on WordPress pages ^^
    I will answer You back right now by mail.
    Thanks again for Your words and the wonderful work You are doing here.
    Jean-Michel RiHET

  11. Hi Don,
    Ken Drew here. For the record, my middle name is Davis, not David: for posterity’s sake, of course. Thanks again for coming out,
    Ken

  12. HI DON! -I READ YOUR STORY ON GLENN MILLER WHO WAS WITH THE 20TH TRANS IN CU CHI.I WAS WORKING WITH A GLENN MILLER IN 69 AND I WOULD LOVE TO KNOW IF THIS IS THE SAME GUY.I TRYED TO REMOVE A TATOO FOR HIM BACK THEN SO I’M SURE HE WOULD REMEMBER ME. HOW CAN I FIND OUT? I SURE WOULD LIKE SOME HELP IF YOU CAN. THANKS! GEORGE KLINGBEIL/FROM OCALA FLORIDIA

  13. Hello Don, I just completed reading your story about SGT John Zajdlik. Thank you for writing a celebration of this man’s time with our unit from the First Cavalry Division, the First Battalion Fifth Cavalry. You did a great job and so did John.

    I would like to submit two corrections which I do not believe are your fault and I can certainly understand why John might have confused the date and the name of the mountain, because I was unsure until I researched them for my own writing.

    First, John could not have been in the Michelin in March of 1968 because the First Cav was in I Corps, up north in the Spring of 1968. During March 1968, right after TET 1968, the First Cav engaged in helping to relieve the Marines at the Siege of Khe Sanh at that time. John did not arrive in Vietnam until November of 1968, since he told us that he flew home on Halloween, October 1969. A very happy memory.

    The Battles in the Michelin to which John refers, took place from 18 March to 2 April 1969. Those battles were part of Operation Atlas Wedge. Operation Atlas Wedge was a joint operation in the Michelin against an entrenched North Vietnamese Army (NVA) force.

    The American units involved were: The First Battalion, Fourth Cavalry, 1/4 or Quarter Cav, of the First Infantry Division, (Big Red One). The Quarter Cav was a heavy infantry battalion using tracked vehicles, called Armored Personnel Carriers, (APCs). The Quarter Cav, under LTC Bill Haponski, attacked from the East. The The 11th Armored Cavalry Division, brought Armor, heavy tanks from the South. John is correct that the First Battalion, Fifth Cavalry, the “Black Knights” of the First Air Cavalry Division also participated in the battle. In one part of the battle 1/5 riflemen, like John attacked from the West. Another rifle company was assigned to Quarter Cav to work with the APCs and the tanks.

    Haponski writes extensively about Operation Atlas Wedge and Task Force Haponski in his book, “A Hell of A Ride”. Retired Brigadier General John “Doc” Bahnsen also references Operation Atlas Wedge in his book, “American Warrior”. Chaplain Claude Newby also references Operation Atlas Wedge the 1/5 of the First Air Cavalry Division in his book, “It Took Heroes”. Chaplain Newby and Chaplain Lamar Hunt were the Chaplains of 1/5, First Air Cavalry Division at that time. I served as their assistant.

    Landing Zone (LZ) Dolly was not located on The Black Virgin Mountain (Nui Ba Den). LZ Dolly was located on the top of a small mountain, named Nui Ong. The Black Virgin Mountain was 22 kilometers due West of LZ Dolly. I can remember the spectacular sunsets looking over the helicopter pad with the Black Virgin Mountain silhouetted by the red tropical sun. I served with the 1/5, First Air Cavalry Division on LZ Dolly from January to June 1969.

    LZ Dolly was attacked during Operation Atlas Wedge on the night of 26 March 1969. We lost many good men that night.

    I am so glad for John telling his story. It is a remarkable story.

    Your writing is outstanding. Thank you for telling John’s story.

    Most of the writing about Vietnam is from 1967 and before. 1968 and 1969 were very important years in our country’s Vietnam experience. There are many important stories to tell from that incredible time and they need to be told.

    Please tell John that I said, “Welcome Home!”

    Jason Holmes then (SP5).
    440 Great Hill
    Ballwin, MO 63021
    radjason@earthlink.net

  14. I am looking for information about my father who died in 1965, he served on the USS St. Mary 1943-1946 his name is Ernest C Thomas Jr. all info will be greatfully appreciated also was there a fire on the ship my contact info is
    barbrosewired@yahoo.com

  15. Thank you for your story on Hank Abajian. As a relative I’m always interested in another story I haven’t heard before that comes out. He won one of the highest civilian medals that our country offers but he would never mention it. Keep up the good work. Bob Belorussian

    • Bob,

      Hank was obviously a very smart individual. His talents in support of the war effort during the Second World War went a long way toward helping us win the war. It was a real pleasure telling his story.

      Regards,
      Don Moore

  16. Exciting to find your web site. As the son of a WWII tanker who island hopped Biak, Letye etc, I find little information about their experiences. That he survived 12+ landings seems amazing and feel the stories and photographs should be recorded somewhere. Please advise.

    • Your dad must have a lot of interesting WW II stories to tell. If he is still alive and living in the Sun’s circulation area I’d love to tell them. If not, the best advice I can give you is to talk to your local newspaper and see if they would be interested in writing his story. You might show whoever you contact at your local paper my web site and tell the person you talk with to contact me. I’d be glad to tell them how well received and how well read these stories are. During the 12 years I’ve written “War Tales” and the 1,000 plus war stories the Sun has run, I can assure them there are few stories in anyone’s paper better liked.
      Regards,
      Don Moore
      Sun Newspapers

  17. I remember the General’s mission to bring back the P.O.W.s, I was just Company Grade Officer when I’d tried to contact him at one point to see if there was any way I could be of help, but wasn’t ever able to connect. I figured we must be related somehow as our last name isn’t Smith, Jones or anything common. Reguards,
    Guy Ogan, Maj. USAF (Ret)
    Abilene, TX

  18. Don,

    The story on Rodger Craig has several discrepancies along with some minor mispellings. Please contact him and/or Louise to get this correct. Its so wonderful to have the story written but it should be correct. Respectfully Melodie Honn ( their daughter)

  19. Don,

    Do you know when First. Lt. Roger Smith flew F-13 spy missions over the Soviet Union? You wrote, “immediately after World War II.” Here’s why I ask… I believe the Suella J flew POW supply missions Between August 27-September 20, 1945. And in July 1946, the Suella J took part in Operation Crossroads, the atomic tests at Bikini Atoll. So I’m trying to figure out when Smith’s spy flights took place in the scheme of things.

    • Bill,
      Would you believe I can’t find Roger’s folder in my file. I’ve got over 1,000 of these stories and I must have misfiled his yarn. Off the top of my head I remember him telling me he flew his B-29 into Russia right after WW II before the Russians had perfected their radar to the point they could tell when an American plane flew into their air space. My recollection is that he said it was 1946 or so.
      Don Moore
      Sun Newspapers

  20. Don,

    After I posted that message, I re-read your story. It actually includes a number of dates which allow me to pinpoint the date (range) of those missions pretty closely. And yes, it was late-1946 and they continued for three months. I recently contacted the National Archive to see what they have on the Suela J and its crew. I’m very interested in knowing who the flight engineer was.

  21. I just read your story about Capt. Luis Chirichigno. Back in the 70’s I ordered a MIA/POW bracelet in the mail and I received my bracelet with his name on it. I often wondered what happened to the soldier of bracelet. I just typed his name and googled it and I found this article. I am not sure if it is the same soldier or not, but it was nice to finally put a face to the name of my soldier. Glad he made it safely back.

  22. Patricia –
    To my knowledge there is only one Capt. Luis Chirichigno. Interesting how the internet can work for us. Thank you for writing.

  23. Don. Enjoyed the piece on Ted Weatherhead. Is he still living? If so, is there a way I can contact him. Many thanks.
    Brooks Tegler

    • Brooks,
      I just tried to call Ted Weatherhead and got a recorded message that the number is no longer in service. His number was 941-475-5149 and his street address was 725 Butterfreed Circle, Tangereen Woods, Englewood, Fla. ????? Got the funny feeling Ted may no longer be among he living. Sorry about that.
      Regards,
      Don Moore
      Sun Newspapers
      War Tales

      • Many thanks for the ‘follow-up Don. I will continue to search for pilots…

  24. Don, my dad, William E. Hurst, served on the USS Salerno Bay, CVE-110 in ’44 and ’45. He was a Tech Sgt. with the Marines. They were responsible for bore-sighting the Corsairs, loading the ammo boxes in the wings, etc. He told me stories of going to Okinawa, Saipan and getting caught in a typhoon. Do you know if there are any survivors of that maiden voyage? My dad passed away in ’06. One humorous thing I remember, he said while they were sailing from San Diego to Honolulu and far from the combat zone, the pilots would fly practice missions with beer loaded in the ammo boxes. When they returned, the beer was good and cold.

  25. Don, Just read “Jack Monahan served 3 tours in Vietnam, now he barely survives on veteran’s pension”. I served in Delta Company, MCB 12 while it was deployed to Vietnam. Now I don’t know who he is trying to BS, but the security guards did not go on patrols and they did not lead combat patrols with a Seabee in charge. Being on the security force meant you were dead weight to the company you were assigned to and you were sent to security to keep the good guys from having to go. They spent their days filling sandbags, and sat in the towers at night. Sorry he lives on a pension, but don’t try to be a hero when you weren’t! That is stolen valor!!! I would delete that story.

    Joe Frohwitter CWO2 USN Ret
    SW3 in MCB 12

    • “the security guards did not go on patrols and they did not lead combat patrols with a Seabee in charge”
      i did not say this – if i was able to read what was being published i would have corrected this and other things.
      “Being on the security force meant you were dead weight to the company you were assigned to and you were sent to security to keep the good guys from having to go.” i was a good guy and so were others i security company.
      i am not a hero and never proclaimed to be one…..
      jak the slug…

      • We have a reunion every two years. The next one is in Maine in 2016. You did little to correct the story, did you?

      • JAK the slug, you got the right name, Slug! When did we wear black berets? Never! The picture of you is just as BS as your story!

  26. Trying to locate a picture or any information as to how he died . Pvt. Howard E. Moore, 79th Infantry Div, 315th Inf Regiment, KIA Oct or Nov 1944, buried Epinol France? Thanks, Art Look…

  27. My Uncle also served on the USS Escalante AO-70 during WW11. Seaman 1st class Paul W Welsh. Any leads on how to obtain additional info?

  28. Hi Don,
    Just read an article from Robert Wallace, radio man on a B-29 Superfortress called “Pride of the Yankees”. My father Eugene Kidrick was the tail gunner on that plane. He told us the store of the engines and many others. How could i contact Robert Wallace? Not many of those guys still alive. My father has passed.

    • Kristi –

      My condolences on your father’s passing. We’re losing way too many of these guys.

      After checking in archives, I’ve discovered Robert Wallace passed away on Tuesday, March 1, 2011. There’s no more information I can find at this time, but will keep looking.

      Thank you for reading War Tales.

  29. Don you wrote about my son in books 1 and 2. Are u still doing the books. He is now flying Blackhawks

  30. Hello. I read your article about fred butts and the sward he took from herman gerings house. My friends dad was there also and has the sister to mr. Butts sword. He got from the eagles nest. I have photos of the sword if you are interested .

  31. Mr. Moore,

    I read the article about Sgt. Gannon, the claims he made are false. I was attached to Sgt. Gannons unit . I was a Inactive Ready Reserve. Myself and 3 other people were the only soldiers attached to 82nd airborne in camp Echo in Diwaniyah , Iraq. We only spent 10 months at Camp Echo. During the last 4 months we asked upon our brothers from 1/182 to come help us. they sent 1 platoon at a time so Sgt. Gannon couldn’t have been there for no longer than a month. Now during that month he did do route clearance but his main base and job was Camp Adder and convoy security. We did not have ASV’s we had Humvee’s. Now I am not sure about the rest of his story is true or not true he may have ran into the issues he talk about do to the fact he was not with us but for a month. oh yeah and he was a driver when he was with us not a vehicle commander. I am not trying to talk his job down just want to give you the facts of what I know and remember. If he is lying about these little of things to make his story sound good or better I’m pretty sure he is lying about a lot more For example order coming from General Petraeus.

    You can find the post that people who have got ahold of this article and have been piecing his story together on my facebook page.

    Thanks,
    Larry Mannor

  32. Mr. Moore,

    I also read the article about Sgt. Gannon, and can tell you that most of what he told you was made up. I went on the same deployment, with the same unit as Mr. Gannon.
    The incident with the girl that he tells about her father blowing her up NEVER happened.
    The incident where he tells about getting hit while in an ASV is only partially correct.
    The incident where a bus full of 30 people “massacred” by a soldier from the 82d did not happen.
    Mr. Gannon only spent about a month on route clearing teams, then platoon he was assigned to returned to our “home base” at Camp Tallil, and he resumed performing duties as convoy security.
    If I remember correctly, (and I do), Mr. Gannon at no time was a vehicle commader or TC while the unit was performing duties as Convoy Security, because at the time he held the rank of Specialist(SPC) and as such would have been either a driver or gunner. The job of TC was normally done by Sgt or SSG, both of which are NCO’s.
    At the time of our deployment, everyone there was “attached” to the 82d Airborne, because the 82d was in charge of that battle-space, what we referred to as the “landholders”.

    While I am not saying that Mr. Gannon did not do his part, It really bothers me that he would mislead and falsify his story so much. I do not blame you, but I do wish there was a way to verify facts before you post such fairy-tales.

    Thank You,

    SFC (RET) Mark C. Caswell

    • To all of you who commented, refuting Gannon’s service history. I’m currently looking for his folder with copy of his DD-214, and will act upon that.

      We strive for accuracy, yet sometimes some slip by us, in spite of a DD-214.

      Thank you for your service, and again, thank you for taking the time and trouble to comment here on War Tales. Stay tuned.

  33. I read the War Tales article about Jim King from Punta Gorda Florida. I believe I was with Jim in Vietnam. If possible could you contact him and if possible give him my email address. The article was published in 2011 so I am not sure if it would be possible for you to still contact Jim.

    Thanks

    Dan McFadden

  34. Read your article on Dick Cook. I ran around with a Dick Cook, graduated with him from Washington High School in Cedar Rapids, Ia. in 1958. We unlisted in the USNR during our senior year in school. Upon graduation we received our active duty orders and went our separate ways. Last i knew, he lived in Florida. Any way i can find out if this Dick Cook is the person I’m trying to locate?

  35. I’d like to be a part of this living wall. Vietnam Service, 1968 1968 II Corps. Interrogator of prisoners of war.

  36. Don, I have read your stories for days combing through them looking for one man Harry Moore he was in Dorset England Dec 1943 or Jan 1944 and been in the area before D-Day movements. He may have died in several severe bombings in that area concentrated on the troops hotels. There he met Marjorie Hanger a Women’s land Army enlistee in October of 1944 she had their son Richard John Hanger she waited for him to return but he did not. Marjorie has since passed in 2010 and Richard is looking for his father he only had one request to see a photograph of him before he looses his vision to Macular Degeneration which is hereditary. I created a blog page in the hopes someone would recognize this information at findingharrymoore.blogspot.com. He is now 70 years old and has children and grandchildren who just want to know who they come from. According to AncestryDNA we are a 5th to 8th cousin match it would be my heart’s desire to help him find the answers he has been searching for some 30 years or more. If you know of Harry Moore or how I may better be able to locate him would you please let me know.

  37. My grandfather had a similar story. He had to stay in Germany for 6 months longer because he adopted a boxer from berchtesgaden. He brought a nazi officers ornamental knife, a filigreed butterfly gold bracelet, and the strangest thing was a 5 ft silk and lace christening gown. I would like to know if the family has photos of the company he was in or his time there.

  38. Hi Don,
    Nice talking with you yesterday about David Frey. I did send him the info to Japan. Another issue – about 10 years ago you did a story about me and SeaFloat. I built the original one in 1969 and built a replica for the National Vietnam War Museum in Orlando. Can’t seem to find it in the archives, can you guide me to the site?
    Thanks.
    Ron

    • Ron –
      The reason you can’t find your story in the archives is because it hasn’t been posted. I’ll see if Mary can locate it. More than likely we won’t have good pictures so if you have pictures from the story, I might be asking you for them.

  39. My dad James Boddie was on the USS St Mary.I have a great photo of him and an unknown shipmate. Anyone interested please contact me. Thank you.-Kelly Boddie Tinica, IL

  40. Just read the story written about my father, James Hawn, and his experience at the Chosin Reservoir. There are some inaccuracies. He discharged from the Corps in 1954 after 4 years service, not 1946 as depicted. He was a Staff Sergeant at discharge, one stripe more than a Sergeant. Also, He served in Korea with King Battery, 4th Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment (not 10th as listed). The rest of the article was pretty good and I thank you for putting it out.

    James Hawn Jr.

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